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Triumph Announces 110th Anniversary Bonneville T100

Triumph announces its limited-edition 110th Anniversary Bonneville T100.

Triumph announces its limited-edition 110th Anniversary Bonneville T100.

Press Release
March 16, 2012
Filed under Latest News, Triumph Motorcycle Reviews

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Triumph has prided itself on building some of the finest motorcycles in the world since 1902. Triumph, which has been associated with high performance and timeless appeal, has created an anniversary edition of the Bonneville T100 that is a tribute to the iconic Triumph brand.

The 2012 Bonneville T100 110th Anniversary Edition is based on the standard T100 model, itself a modern reinterpretation of the classic Bonnevilles from the 1960s. The 110th Anniversary Edition features an Aluminum Silver and Khaki Green paint scheme similar to those featured on the earliest Triumph motorcycles. Other special features include a reinterpretation of the original Triumph crest on the bike’s side covers, as well as a chrome chain guard, cam cover and grab rail.

The 110th Anniversary 2012 Limited-Edition Bonneville T100 include a reinterpretation of the original Triumph crest on the bike's side covers.

The 110th Anniversary 2012 Limited-Edition Bonneville T100 include a reinterpretation of the original Triumph crest on the bike's side covers.

Mechanically, the 110th Anniversary Edition features the same, torquey 865cc parallel twin from the standard Bonneville T100. With dual overhead cams, modern fuel injection and 67bhp on tap, this engine offers real-world performance, clean running and a uniquely British soundtrack. Suspension is also identical to the T100, with 41mm front forks and traditional chromed rear shocks delivering poised handling and a comfortable ride.

Each limited-edition 110th Anniversary Bonneville T100 includes a numbered plaque on the handlebar clamp and a certificate of authenticity. Only 1,000 models will be built worldwide, with 250 allotted for the U.S. and 25 for Canada. Price for the 110th Anniversary Edition is set at $10,499 U.S ($10,999 Canada), with availability beginning in May.

For more information on Triumph’s 2012 range, visit www.triumphmotorcycles.com.

Comments

6 Responses to “Triumph Announces 110th Anniversary Bonneville T100”

  1. Bob M on March 16th, 2012 4:48 pm

    I’ve owned two great Hinckley Triumphs, a Trophy 900 and a Speed Triple. I’d buy one of their retro bikes in a heartbeat if they would only re-learn how to build a proper gas tank without that hideous manufacturing seam on the bottom. Just like they used to 40 years ago….

    [Reply]

    Joe Reply:

    Srsly?

    Of the 1000 parts that go into a bike, and the 1000 engineering and styling and manufacturing decisions that go into building a bike, the only thing you can think of to mention is the tank seam?

    [Reply]

    Bob M Reply:

    Actually, no. If we’re talking specifically about the “new” Triumph retro’s, I could also easily complain about their low-end suspension components; irrefutably mediocre brakes; and relatively dismal engine performance.
    But quite simply, these specific machines are more nostalgic styling exercises (i.e. primarily form over function) than truly modern motorcycles. That said, they should get rid of the goofy tank seam.

    [Reply]

    Joe Reply:

    I’m confused. You (could) easily complain about substantive deficits that would absolutely bar the bikes from my consideration, and, it would seem, yours, but you would, ” . . . buy one of their retro bikes in a heartbeat if they would only re-learn how to build a proper gas tank without that hideous manufacturing seam . . . “

    Bob M Reply:

    Good points, Joe. Sorry for the confusion. I would consider buying one, performance warts and all, as a cool looking, modestly-priced, retro “nostalgic styling exercise” (with relatively modern parts), not as something to compete with a truly modern motorcycle.

  2. John on April 2nd, 2012 7:29 pm

    I owned a 1976 (last year for that time) T120 Bonneville that I really loved. It had the most beautiful styling with “just right” proportions, and respectable performance for a twin. Sadly, it had too many mechanical gremlins for me to consider keeping long term, but I still wish I’d kept it.

    This new one just doesn’t have the look that moves me like the old one. Also, I question their claim of building production bikes dated 1902.

    [Reply]

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